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Common Choking Hazards for Children

Children are not just physically and mentally limited to protect themselves, but they can also be curious and reckless, putting them at risk of injuries. One of the most common causes of injuries in children is choking. As the adult, you have the responsibility to make sure that the children are in safe conditions to prevent the risks of choking.

The common choking hazards for children are listed below, because the first step to prevention is knowledge.

Food
Children have the tendency to not chew their food and swallow it whole, putting them at risk of choking. The most common food items that can be choking hazards are hard and round, such as nuts, seeds, popcorns, candies, raisins, hotdogs, and even chunks of meat and vegetables.

That does not mean you should avoid these food items altogether. You can cut them up to smaller pieces, so when the child accidently swallows them whole, they will not be stuck in the throat. Also, discipline the child to focus on the act of eating and to employ the proper eating position to prevent accidental choking.

Toys
Consider the toys you get for your child, as they can be choking hazards as well. This is especially true on small toys, such as balloons and marbles. But even big toys can be choking hazards, especially those that have small detachable parts that your child may put in his or her mouth. Avoid these kinds of toys or at least read the age-appropriation of the toys before you buy them for your child.

Toys as choking hazards are taken seriously even by the legal community. There are lawyers who specialize on choking hazard claims on children toys, such as those from Habush Habush & Rottier S.C. ®.

Small Objects
Any small item inside or outside the household can be a choking hazard, such as coins, pins, magnets, and rocks. Always supervise your child to make sure that he or she is not putting small objects in the mouth. Even better, make small objects inaccessible for your child. Put the coins, pins, and magnets on places where they are organized and not on the reach of your child.